White Nights and Blue Moons

Two gates the silent house of Sleep adorn;
Of polish'd ivory this, that of transparent horn:
True visions thro' transparent horn arise;
Thro' polish'd ivory pass deluding lies.

erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

(via uispeccoll)

vintagelibraries:

Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County, Main Hall, year unknown.

vintagelibraries:

Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County, Main Hall, year unknown.

uispeccoll:

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding
Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.
Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.
Update: This post featured on several art and news blogs since it appeared, such as Colossal, Neatorama and Gizmodo.

Reblogging the original.

uispeccoll:

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding

Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.

Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

Update: This post featured on several art and news blogs since it appeared, such as Colossal, Neatorama and Gizmodo.

Reblogging the original.

leo-topp:

My reading spot today: Corpus Christi College Library, Oxford. Sadly, no tea allowed in here!

leo-topp:

My reading spot today: Corpus Christi College Library, Oxford. Sadly, no tea allowed in here!

(via beautifuloxford)

The library of the palace of Mafra, where bats are used at night to control insects.

The library of the palace of Mafra, where bats are used at night to control insects.

A Carthusian monk sits reading in his cell in England, 1985.

A Carthusian monk sits reading in his cell in England, 1985.

National Press Club Library in the Riggs Building, 1914.

National Press Club Library in the Riggs Building, 1914.